#17 sharing

Digital Development Debates - be part of the debates!

The idea of the shareconomy has given rise to a variety of thoughts of how to use technological inventions to enhance development. It will have a lot of implications for the economy, journalism, education, and the way all of us interact…

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Table of Contents Issue #17Featured Articles #17

“A Historic Shift in Conversation”

Transition Network aims at the mind sets of developed countries - seeking to transform the affluent Western way of life.

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Generous Envy

The willingness to share depends on different motifs – even envy. Examples from Pakistan, Latin America and the USA.

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Fight for Rio’s Streets

In Brazil Graffiti is a weapon of the poor and disinherited. Artists are reclaiming the streets, using their fame to build and educate their communities.

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What Do You Share With a Stranger?

Performance-based artist from India, Amitesh Grover connects strangers from all around the world – without sharing a room.

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“Happiness Is a Skill”

Tho Ha Vinh, Program Director of Bhutan’s Gross National Happiness Center, explains why happiness is a more important indicator than economic growth.

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Possession Rather Than Ownership

Alternative economic approaches – based on commons – have emerged around the turn of the century. Are we heading towards the “ecommony”?

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Facts or Rumors?

Social media plays a huge role in African conflict zones. It offers ways for evading media restrictions, but also bears dangers inherent in its use.

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The Hashtag Protest

Ever since the Arab Spring, social media has been praised as a means for civic engagement. Despite its positive impact, restrictions remain.

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Chapters #17

Beyond the magazine

“We can’t just leave solutions to the politicians“

Conference on Religion’s Contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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Broken Toilets

Emily Madsen and Samyuktha Varma have created an international magazine intended to change reporting on development work.

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Challenges for the Media – from Information to Participation

Just a blink of the eye in world history, the 40-year existence of the Internet has been revolutionary.

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Interview: Development Aid is Not All Plain Sailing

5 questions to Andris Piebalgs

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Top 16 Articles from last 4 Issues

Our Issues and Featured Authors

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Coming Issue of DDD

For some work means fulfillment, for the majority of us it is a means to survive. For some working means calculating on a computer, for others painting a wall, others plant food to eat.
And the paradox goes even further: Politicians all over the world ask for more jobs to guarantee an income for their citizens. At the same time companies and scientist invest in new technologies to become more productive and therefore save work.
Ever since the first introduction of machines, people are discussing, if work is still needed in the future, and how it will change. John Maynard Keynes in the 20th century expected his grandkids to be working 15 hours a week, while more skeptical voices feared mass unemployment and connected instability.
DDD issue #20 asks: What does work look like in the 21. century? And what does it mean for development cooperation?

Tell us what you think; submit your ideas and be part of the debates! – contact us.