#14 movement

Digital Development Debates - be part of the debates!

All around the world people are on the move. Orders are being challenged by social movements in many countries. Talking about movement opens up a rich space of association that allows us to explore the pressing issues of our time.

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Table of Contents Issue #14Featured Articles #14

The Globalisation of the Naked Protest

Nudity - employed around the globe and throughout history - can be a powerful symbolic resource for protest movements.

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One Click Away?

Social networks and dating sites make long distance relationships easier. The seemingly borderless digital world is limited though, by national borders.

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“Society Is Always Divided”

Renowned political theorist Chantal Mouffe discusses democracy, right-wing populism, and the possibility of a multi-polar world order.

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Displaced in Their Own Country

Thousands of people have left their homes in Iraq to seek refuge. Many continue to stay in the country. What is life like for those internal refugees?

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The End of Growth: Panic or Salvation?

What happens when growth ends? Whether the world is heading for disaster or a golden age is a question of demographics.

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Exclusion Through Citizenship

How does national citizenship play a role in the maintenance and reproduction of global inequalities?

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A Digital Narrative

Nana Oforiatta Ayim creates films as a form of research in action. It is her quest to uncover alternative history about and within Africa.

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Chapters #14

Beyond the magazine

“We can’t just leave solutions to the politicians“

Conference on Religion’s Contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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Broken Toilets

Emily Madsen and Samyuktha Varma have created an international magazine intended to change reporting on development work.

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Challenges for the Media – from Information to Participation

Just a blink of the eye in world history, the 40-year existence of the Internet has been revolutionary.

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Interview: Development Aid is Not All Plain Sailing

5 questions to Andris Piebalgs

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Top 16 Articles from last 4 Issues

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Coming Issue of DDD

For some work means fulfillment, for the majority of us it is a means to survive. For some working means calculating on a computer, for others painting a wall, others plant food to eat.
And the paradox goes even further: Politicians all over the world ask for more jobs to guarantee an income for their citizens. At the same time companies and scientist invest in new technologies to become more productive and therefore save work.
Ever since the first introduction of machines, people are discussing, if work is still needed in the future, and how it will change. John Maynard Keynes in the 20th century expected his grandkids to be working 15 hours a week, while more skeptical voices feared mass unemployment and connected instability.
DDD issue #20 asks: What does work look like in the 21. century? And what does it mean for development cooperation?

Tell us what you think; submit your ideas and be part of the debates! – contact us.